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The Art Studio NY

#1 Rated Art Classes in New York City!

As Seen On:

"The Art Studio NY
is one of New York's
true delights, a welcoming
environment, and an amazing
place to learn & let your
creative spirit soar."

-The Examiner

Molly Kuribayashi is an online art teacher giving lessons and art tutorials at The Art Studio NY on 96th street on the upper west side

Molly Kuribayashi

Art Instructor (Kids and Adults)

Molly is a great believer in the lively power of art and she loves to convey that positive energy to others. When her art students try something new, they are encouraged to explore, experiment, push critical thinking, and build confidence, agency and self-esteem. Molly finds that encouraging students to produce and enjoy art is a wonderful means for them to find focus and relax, all the while, gaining exposure to fascinating principles of self-expression, art and design.

Molly began teaching with The Art Studio NY in 2016 when she launched and managed a children’s after school art program for kids in New Jersey. During that time, she also became a favorite art tutor and art teacher to students and staff alike in our New York City art studio. Molly’s engaging and enthusiastic teaching style is inspiring to kids and adults alike in our virtual art classes for students worldwide.

Molly has exhibited her artwork in numerous art galleries and her teaching experience ranges from young children, college level classes, adults and senior citizens. She has also homeschooled her own children and she finds every level and phase of development to be interesting and an exciting challenge.

Molly earned her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in printmaking, where she studied under the direction of Michael Miller and acclaimed Hairy Who / Chicago Imagist painter, Christina Ramberg. Molly’s works is multimedia, combining printmaking and painting techniques. Her work explores composite-like juxtapositions of line, texture, and color to create perplexing and beguiling spatial relationships. Molly finds it impossible to declare a favorite artist, as her list ranges widely from Baroque artist, Piranesi, through many 19th, 20th and 21st century “isms”, such as German Expressionism, Dada, American Abstract Expressionism and many others.